Notes:

For reasons which escape me, Samba's smbclient tool offers a dialect called "NT LANMAN 1.0". It's typically nestled in between the "Samba" dialect and "NT LM 0.12".

    Dialect[0] = "\x02PC NETWORK PROGRAM 1.0"
    Dialect[1] = "\x02MICROSOFT NETWORKS 1.03"
    Dialect[2] = "\x02MICROSOFT NETWORKS 3.0"
    Dialect[3] = "\x02LANMAN1.0"
    Dialect[4] = "\x02LM1.2X002"
    Dialect[5] = "\x02LANMAN2.1"
    Dialect[6] = "\x02Samba"
    Dialect[7] = "\x02NT LANMAN 1.0"
    Dialect[8] = "\x02NT LM 0.12"

I spent a couple of hours one day trying to figure out what this dialect was all about and why smbclient was sending it. Even more annoying, Samba was selecting it instead of "NT LM 0.12".

Jeremy Allison says that, internally, "NT LANMAN 1.0" is the same as "NT LM 0.12". I'm still not sure why it's there or why it is selected instead of "NT LM 0.12", but it is (apparently) harmless.

NT LANMAN 1.0 == NT LM 0.12



Update (28-Jan-2009): 

Search the web for a document named "SMB-NT01". This is, supposedly, a confidential Microsoft document from 1992 that starts to describe an SMB/CIFS dialect for Windows NT. That dialect is labeled "NT LANMAN 1.0".

Either the NT LANmanager 1.0 dialect was replace by "NT LM 0.12" or the latter was a precursor and the 1.0 version was never fully realized.

A quick capture shows that Windows NT 3.51 negotiates "NT LM 0.12", but does not list "NT LANMAN 1.0" as an option.



Update (12-Feb-2009): 

Günter Kukkukk pointed out that newer versions of Samba's smbclient now also offer the "DOS LANMAN2.1" dialect:

    Dialect[0] = "\x02PC NETWORK PROGRAM 1.0"
    Dialect[1] = "\x02MICROSOFT NETWORKS 1.03"
    Dialect[2] = "\x02MICROSOFT NETWORKS 3.0"
    Dialect[3] = "\x02LANMAN1.0"
    Dialect[4] = "\x02LM1.2X002"
    Dialect[5] = "\x02DOS LANMAN2.1"
    Dialect[6] = "\x02LANMAN2.1"
    Dialect[7] = "\x02Samba"
    Dialect[8] = "\x02NT LANMAN 1.0"
    Dialect[9] = "\x02NT LM 0.12"
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